Charlottesville, Kenya, Soccer: Your Monday Briefing

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Amid rising antimigrant sentiment in Italy, the government in Rome has pressed aid groups to allow armed Italian judicial officers to board their ships, a demand that many have rejected. Italy also sent a naval mission to assist the Libyan Coast Guard to curb human trafficking.

Critics say there is concern over the inhumane conditions migrants face if they are returned to Libya and held in detention centers.

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Credit Thomas Mukoya/Reuters

In Kenya, several deaths have been reported in election-related violence.

Raila Odinga, above, the opposition leader, called on his supporters to strike today, claiming that the election had been rigged. International observers concluded that it was generally fair and transparent.

Separately in Burkina Faso, at least 17 people have been reported killed in an attack on a restaurant frequented by foreigners in the capital, Ouagadougou.

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Credit Paulo Cunha/European Pressphoto Agency

• Forest fires are spreading again across Southern Europe.

In Portugal, our correspondent looked at political inaction and poor land management, which have exacerbated the hazard. “There is a big waste of public money in the fight against fires and almost nothing spent on prevention,” one prosecutor said.

Fires have also spread in southern parts of France, including Corsica, and in Greece.

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Credit Franck Robichon/European Pressphoto Agency

At the world track and field championships in London, Usain Bolt, above, pulled out of his final race because of an injury, leading to a surprise British victory. There were no medals for Russia despite victories by Russian athletes. We explain.

In soccer, the national leagues kicked off with some surprises. The defending Premier League champion, Chelsea, lost to visiting Burnley, 3-2. In Germany, Hamburger S.V. was defeated, 3-1, by a 10-man team from Osnabrück. In Italy, Lazio scored a 3-2 victory against Juventus.

Perhaps less surprising was Neymar’s triumphant debut with Paris Saint-Germain against Guingamp. It ended 3-0. In Spain, Real Madrid beat Barcelona, 3-1.

Here’s a roundup of more sports news, including a 20-year-old German ending Roger Federer’s winning streak.

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Business

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Credit John Thys/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

“Our beautiful family farm is hanging by a silk thread.” That’s what a Dutch farmer who has to destroy 100,000 eggs over Europe’s widening tainted eggs scare told us.

• The stereotype of the loner genius nerd has become a damaging myth in the U.S. tech industry.

Digital wallets and peer-to-peer payment apps are quickly becoming part of everyday life. Here’s a primer on leading platforms.

Here’s a snapshot of global markets.

In the News

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Credit Peter Thompson/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

• The Danish owner of a submarine is facing manslaughter charges over the disappearance of Kim Wall, a Swedish journalist. Above, Ms. Wall on the submarine, which was later deliberately sunk, according to an investigator. [The New York Times]

• In Istanbul, a man believed to be an Islamic State militant killed a police officer while in custody, the official Turkish news media reported. [Andalou Agency]

• German politicians returned to the campaign trail ahead of general elections in September. The conservatives of Chancellor Angela Merkel remain ahead, and there’s some talk of a coalition with the Free Democratic Party. [Politico]

• Two rivals in the British cabinet jointly defended the government over accusations that it was divided on “Brexit,” saying that Britain’s departure from the E.U. required a “time limited” transitional phase. [BBC]

• Russia will send thousands of soldiers to Belarus for military drills next month. There are widespread fears they will never leave. [The New York Times]

• In Washington, the special counsel investigating Russian interference in the U.S. elections last year is said to be in talks with the White House about interviewing current and former officials. [The New York Times]

Smarter Living

Tips, both new and old, for a more fulfilling life.

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Credit Sven Hoppe/DPA, via Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

• If you want to sync your calendar with the solar system, sign up here to add meteor showers, eclipses and other cosmic special events to Google or iOS calendars.

• Why you shouldn’t put off a password manager any longer, and more in our weekly newsletter.

• Recipe of the day: Make practically any fruit into a cobbler with Melissa Clark’s fantastic recipe.

Noteworthy

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Credit Justin Gilliland/The New York Times

• Among our most-read stories in Europe today is the tale of a couple in New York who met at a gym a few years ago. Aged 98 and 94, they just got married. “Age doesn’t mean a damn thing,” the groom said.

A recent article on bacteria in dirty sponges sparked a deluge of questions from readers. Here are a few answers.

• In baking news, conservationists discovered a 106-year-old fruitcake in Antarctica that was said to smell “almost” edible. And here’s what’s next for “The Great British Bake Off,” a hit television series.

Here’s our review of the latest “Game of Thrones” episode. There was some satisfaction that comes from dots getting connected.

• In memoriam: Israel Kristal, a Holocaust survivor who was the world’s oldest man, died in Israel at 113.

Back Story

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Credit Associated Press

North and South Korea have agreed on very little in recent decades, but this week their shared past means the two countries have a rare holiday in common: Independence Day.

Called Gwangbokjeol (“the day the light returned”) in the South and Chogukhaebangui nal (“Liberation of the Fatherland Day”) in the North, the holiday is what is known in the West as V-J Day, or Victory Over Japan Day.

The Japanese Empire formally surrendered on Aug. 15, 1945, ending World War II and liberating the Korean Peninsula, which had been under colonial rule since 1910.

The government of South Korea was established on the same day three years later, and the peninsula was divided.

The holiday is celebrated with patriotic fanfare in both countries, although the North has found new ways to reassert its independence. For the 70th Liberation Day in 2015 — amid renewed military tensions with the South — Pyongyang created its own time zone.

“The wicked Japanese imperialists committed such unpardonable crimes as depriving Korea of even its standard time,” the North’s state-run news agency said.

The country had previously been in the same time zone as South Korea and Japan, but its clocks are now set 30 minutes behind.

Inyoung Kang contributed reporting.

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This briefing was prepared for the European morning. You can browse through past briefings here.

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